Raffle Ticket Printing

There are numerous software packages you can purchase and several interactive websites on which you can create your own tickets.

Professional Ticket Printing

Consider going old school and hire a professional print shop to make up the tickets for you.

It’s worth the little extra money to make sure the tickets come out looking top notch. This professional touch will give your group a credibility that your personal bubble-jet just won’t. I’ve made business cards at home before too, but they never look as sharp as when I’ve paid a printer to do them. In addition, if you find a printer that has done up raffle tickets before, they might be able to help you ensure you’ve got everything you need in the right spot!

Make sure the tickets are printed on a heavy-duty card stock, since they may be in the possession of the ticket buyer a while before the drawing occurs. A thicker stock also makes a better impression than a flimsy piece of paper.

Raffle Tickets

The design, printing and quality of raffle tickets are an important part of planning a raffle.

Raffle Ticket Design

Raffle tickets have two parts- the section that the buyer keeps and the stub that gets turned into the organization for the actual drawing. When individual tickets are sold, be sure that all the information matches on the stub and on the part the buyer keeps. This includes the raffle ticket number (0088 out of 1,000 for example).

When a person buys a ticket(s), the person selling it or collecting it must make sure that all the information is properly filled out. If there is anything that’s isn’t clear, and that ticket happens to win, there can be confusion that could lead to a bad situation for everyone involved.

These kinds of errors can especially happen if the person buys a great number of tickets and quickly scribbles out the information by hand. To avoid any potential headaches, make sure that whoever is collecting the ticket stubs checks to verify all the information is accurate, legible, and complete.

While each state does have different regulations as to what must appear on a raffle ticket, here is a very basic list of what should appear on each portion of the ticket.

On the portion the TICKET BUYER keeps:

  • Name of the non-profit conducting the raffle
  • The date and time of the drawing
  • The location of the drawing- use a specific address, not just the name of the building or business
  • The grand prize and any other lesser prizes that will be awarded
  • The ticket number and the number of total tickets printed- e.g. 0088 of 1,000
  • The amount each ticket costs- e.g. $5 or 5 for $20
  • The statement “Person need not be present to win” (if required)
  • The raffle license number issued by the state (if required)

On the portion the NON-PROFIT keeps (also known as “the stub”):

  • Name of the non-profit conducting the raffle
  • The date of the drawing
  • The buyer’s full name
  • The buyer’s phone number
  • The buyer’s address (street, city, state, zip code)
  • The buyer’s email address

Note: Be sure to make the stub portion of the ticket big enough so that the lines don’t have to be smushed together and people have to write super small. Personally, I can barely print legibly on college ruled lined paper, so please give people like me some room to write legibly!

Raffle Ticket Design Regulations

Check with your state’s regulations as to what has to be legally included on each ticket. Some states have stricter rules/laws than others. For instance, some states require the raffle license number be printed on both parts of the raffle ticket (as well as on all advertisements for the raffle!), while others demand that you include what all the prizes are on the ticket’s face.

Some states even make you print the statement “You need not be present to win” on the ticket. If you miss something that the state requires, that could place your entire raffle in jeopardy. Do your homework before sending the tickets to the printers.

 

More Raffle Ticket Sales Through Multi-Ticket Discounts

It may sound counter intuitive to sell raffle tickets at a discount. However done correctly this technique can provide a boost to sales, create excitement and increase overall revenue.

Think about all the times at the grocery store where you bought more because of offers such as “buy one, get one half price” or 3 for $1. Now we just apply these same concepts that have worked in retail for hundreds of years to your raffle!

The trick is to build in the discount from the beginning. Include any ticket price variations in your official rules. Never, ever, reduce the ticket price mid-way through the raffle. Some groups resort to this option because ticket sales are low, so they think that lowering the price will get more buyers. Not only does this send the wrong message to people (that you are desperate) it may be in violation of the law.

While raffles have a predetermined “donation” in terms of the ticket price, you can encourage people to increase that donation by buying additional tickets. Offering bonus free tickets or a reduced price for a larger number of tickets encourages people to buy more tickets, thus increasing the overall proceeds of the raffle.

There are a variety of ways to structure this promotion, depending on the base price of one ticket. Here are a few examples:

  • $10 for one ticket, $20 for 3 tickets
  • $20 for one ticket, $50 for 3 tickets, $100 for 8 tickets
  • Buy two tickets for the big raffle, get a bonus ticket for a secondary drawing
  • Half price on tickets only during the “kickoff” period, such as the first two weeks of ticket sales
  • Century Club Bonus – donate $100 and get double the number of chances. So if your base ticket price is $10, if the person donates $100 they get 20 chances in the drawing

So as you see there are a many ways that these promotions can be created. Just put yourself in the shoes of the potential ticket buyer and consider what would be attractive to them. What would it take to get them to “bump up” to the next level? Then remember that the goal is to increase the overall proceeds of the raffle and make sure that your promotion will help do that.

Selling raffle tickets online in California

Many charities who do raffles would like to sell tickets online. People who enjoy buying raffle tickets, or any kind of prize drawing, would like to buy tickets online. It might make the whole process easier. But is it possible? Is it legal?

If the charity operating the raffle in California, could people buy tickets online?

Unfortunately it is not legal to do this in California.

According to California penal code 320.4 organizations are not allowed to sell raffle tickets online. The good news is that organizers can post call in or mail in options on their websites. They can keep supporters informed about the progress of the raffle, the winners of early bird drawings on their website too.

As with any kind of fundraiser that could have major legal issues, like raffles or bingo, it is so important to check all of the laws before planning a raffle. If you don’t there could be fines or other penalties. So whether you are in California or Kalamazoo, be sure to follow all the laws regarding buying and selling raffle tickets. And that includes online sales too.

What information should be printed on raffle tickets?

There are key pieces of information that need to be on raffle tickets. There needs to be a section for the purchaser to fill out which will then be put in the drawing container (or raffle drum). The ticket needs to require the purchaser’s name, address, and phone number. You may wish to ask for the person’s email address and have a check box for them to choose if they would like to be added to your email newsletter. This could be an optional, not required field for them to fill out.

On the other part of the ticket print the information about the drawing: the organization’s name, address and/or city, state, phone number, date of the raffle, list of major prizes, and website. Give this stub to the purchaser to keep.

Numbered tickets will enhance the professionalism of your tickets and give your coordinator an easy way to keep track of the number sold. Numbered tickets are also required for some states raffle regulations. Raffle ticket software makes numbering tickets easy.

From Raffle Secrets:

While each state does have different regulations as to what must appear on a raffle ticket, here is a very basic list of what should appear on each portion of the ticket.

On the portion the TICKET BUYER keeps:

  • Name of the non-profit conducting the raffle
  • The date and time of the drawing
  • The location of the drawing- use a specific address, not just the name of the building or business
  • The grand prize and any other lesser prizes that will be awarded
  • The ticket number and the number of total tickets printed- e.g. 0088 of 1,000
  • The amount each ticket costs- e.g. $5 or 5 for $20
  • The statement “Person need not be present to win” (if required)
  • The raffle license number issued by the state (if required)

On the portion the NON-PROFIT keeps (also known as “the stub”):

  • Name of the non-profit conducting the raffle
  • The date of the drawing
  • The buyer’s full name
  • The buyer’s phone number
  • The buyer’s address (street, city, state, zip code)
  • The buyer’s email address

What is raffle ticket software?

Raffle ticket software provides the attractive look of commercially printed tickets at an affordable price. These programs will allow you to make your own custom raffle tickets.

The raffle ticket software will allow you to design the look of the tickets. You can customize the ticket by adding the name of the organization, prize details and any other text information to the tickets. Most raffle ticket software programs will allow you create numbered tickets.

Raffle ticket paper may be purchased from the professional raffle ticket company. Some companies provide “blanks” which are raffle tickets that have a style and design, but just the details of your raffle missing. Those details are then printed using a PC or copier.

Other raffle ticket software companies sell plain cardstock that is already perforated. The other option would be to purchase plain cardstock at an office supply store. The downside is that the paper would not be perforated, so it would not be as easy for your ticket sellers to tear the tickets.

There are many raffle ticket software options. Consider what options are most important to you and use the software to design your own custom raffle tickets.